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Premature babies set to benefit from new space technology platform

Premature babies articlePremature babies article

Computer technology which is used to track astronauts’ statistic in space could one day be saving the lives of seriously ill babies in Western Australia.

Developed by Australian-born computer scientist, Professor Carolyn McGregor, Artemis is capable of collecting and analysing 90 million pieces of data per baby per day.

The Department of Health is investigating the potential of incorporating this technology into its neonatal intensive care units, through a small proof-of-concept study at the King Edward Memorial Hospitalin Western Australia.

Known as Artemis, the computer technology platform would detect subtle but significant changes in a patient's oxygen saturation levels, heart rate and respiratory rate up to 24 hours before the patient began to show visible signs of decline. 

Developed by Australian-born computer scientist, Professor Carolyn McGregor, Artemis is capable of collecting and analysing 90 million pieces of data per baby per day. 

"Artemis will not replace the doctors and nurses who do an amazing job caring for these vulnerable babies but will serve as an early warning system and arm them with additional, and in some cases, vital information”, said Health Minister Roger Cook.

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